Posts made in March 1st, 2016


‘Shower of the Future’ reuses water that would normally go down the drain It uses 80% less electricity than normal showers and 10% as much water Tech similar to that used in International Space Station where no water can be wasted  By Colin Fernandez, Science Correspondent For The Daily Mail Published: 19:12 EST, 22 February 2016 | Updated: 03:00 EST, 23 February 2016 115 View comments A high-tech shower that recycles dirty water could save families more than £1,000 a year in energy bills, its designers say. The technology, which uses 80 per cent less electricity and around 90 per cent less water than a conventional model, is similar to that used in the International Space Station where no water can be wasted. In an ordinary shower, heat is lost when the soapy warm water runs down the drain. By recycling this, the unit radically cuts down the amount of water used – and the electricity needed to heat it. A high-tech shower that recycles your dirty water uses 80 per cent less electricity and just 10 per cent as much water. In an ordinary shower, heat is lost when the soapy warm water runs down the drain. By recycling this, the unit radically cuts down the amount of water used – and the electricity needed to heat it Being so environmentally friendly is not cheap. The shower costs £3,300 for the unit integrated into a bathroom floor, while a stand-alone ‘cabin’ design costs £4,100. But Sweden-based Orbital Systems, makers of the ‘Shower of the Future’, claims a UK family using metered water could save £1,100 a year in energy bills – if four showers are taken a day, each lasting nine minutes. HOW THE SHOWER WORKS  The used water passes through two filters – one that removes larger particles such as skin and dust, and a finer one that gets rid of any bacteria, blood and viruses.  The water is then reheated and circulates back out of the shower head. The manufacturers say the shower starts with five litres of water, but if sensors detect this has become too contaminated to reuse, fresh water is added.   The water then recirculates back out of the shower head. It is reheated to the temperature set by the user – although reheating the water requires much less energy.   The used water passes through two filters – one that removes larger particles such as skin and dust, and a finer one that gets rid of any bacteria, blood and viruses. The water is then reheated and circulates back out of the shower head. The manufacturers say the shower starts with five litres...

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