Marine Exploration


If you thought the humanity has discovered all of our planet’s secrets – think again. We have only scratched the surface in marine exploration and while many scientists point their telescopes at the stars, others know there are alien-like creatures sharing the Earth with us. Recent exploration of Puerto Rico’s seamounts, trenches, and troughs uncovered species residing in the eternal darkness thousands of feet below the surface. Many of the weird and scary looking creatures in this video were never caught on camera and some of them are so unusual they look like they came from another planet. marineexploration –...

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Arcana: A 124-Foot Luxury Explorer Yacht


Posted By on Dec 13, 2016

Yachting Partners International is offering the concept yacht Arcana, a 124-foot luxury explorer by Viareggio, Italy-based Horacio Bozzo Design and France’s JFA Shipyard. The team worked with Hansen Marine Exploration to make the yacht’s design eco-friendly for cruising and charter in remote destinations. Arcana includes reduced noise and emissions compared with traditional explorer yachts, plus a submarine launch-and-recovery platform for exploring the depths with minimal interference. “There is an increasing demand from owners for yachts with enough range and technical capability to allow them to enjoy their yachting much further afield than the usual Mediterranean and Caribbean destinations,” YPI Commercial and Marketing Director Mark Duncan stated in a press release. “There are many yachts on the market today that are tentatively being offered to potential buyers as explorer yachts when in fact they are nothing of the sort.” Want to go to the poles? Arcana can be ordered with ice-class capabilities. Where to learn more about Arcana: click over to www.ypigroup.com marineexploration –...

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What’s at the bottom of the deep blue sea? “Odyssey’s Shipwreck! Pirates & Treasure,” an exhibit at Putnam Museum, will help answer that question. “We’ve all heard stories of pirates and treasures – and what’s so fun about this exhibit is that it lets you experience some of the tangible aspects of the shipwrecks that have been discovered in our oceans,” Kim Findlay, president and CEO at Putnam, said in a news release. “Visitors will experience the thrill and excitement of shipwreck discovery while they learn what it takes to explore the last frontier – deep below the ocean surface. This is an exhibit that children and adults alike will find fascinating.” The exhibit, which runs through Jan. 15, features artifacts discovered by Odyssey Marine Exploration Inc., including the SS Republic, a Civil War-era shipwreck, and silver from the SS Gairsoppa, a World War II vessel. Visitors can also see bottles and coins from the Civil War era, a 300-year-old carpenter’s folding rule, hairbrushes and combs, and even game pieces. Of special interest is a large photomosaic of the site of the Republic’s wreckage, where the ship’s final resting place is 1,700 feet below the surface. Visitors can zoom in on the site to see where the artifacts were found. Also on hand are full-scale replicas of technology and equipment used by Odyssey in its “treasure” hunts. Adding to the fun is a robotic manipulator arm for a hands-on experience at hunting for pieces of the past. Guests can test their skills by trying to pick up coins. Ever wonder what it’s like in a hurricane? Then the wind tunnels, replicating the power of the storms that sunk the Republic, can give you a taste of nature’s windy wrath. There’s also interactive challenges and games that test visitors’ skills at handling ocean recovery missions. Visitors can also dive a little deeper into the museum’s exhibits, thanks to technology that puts information in the palm of their hands. Putnam has introduced a free app for Apple and Android devices designed to enrich the visitor experience with easy-to-use maps, interactive tools and show times. It was provided by Alcoa Foundation. “We’re so thankful to Alcoa for allowing us to create this tool for visitors,” Findlay said. “This app will help enhance the STEM [science, technology, engineering and mathematics] learning that takes place at the science center and make the overall visitor experience much deeper.” To download the app, visit the App Store or Play Store on smartphones or tablets and search for “Putnam Museum.” Explorers who aren’t technologically blessed will find the museum and its Shipwreck display just as fascinating, so...

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France has filed a legal claim to an ancient shipwreck discovered off Cape Canaveral, saying it was part of the French fleet that in 1565 went to the aid of that country’s doomed colony at Fort Caroline in Jacksonville. That follows a claim by the private treasure salvage company that found the wreck, and seems likely to lead to a dispute in U.S. District Court in Orlando over ownership of the artifacts. It would be a high-stakes battle: A state archaeology report says the wreck, if it is indeed connected to the French fleet, “would be of immense archaeological significance.” The wreckage includes at least one particularly spectacular artifact — a granite monument adorned with a symbol of France’s coat of arms, the fleur-de-lis. It’s similar to the one, never discovered, that French Capt. Jean Ribault left at the mouth of the St. Johns River in 1562 to stake a claim to Florida. “That’s your crown jewel there, that’s your holy grail,” said Chuck Meide, a marine archaeologist who led a 2014 expedition that searched for, but did not find, the lost fleet. “I never would have dreamed this.” That marker’s not likely to be the one left at Jacksonville, however, said Meide. Evidence though shows Ribault’s 1565 fleet carried several other stone markers to be used in its exploration of the New World, he said. Meide, director of the maritime archaeological program at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Museum, is among those who believe the wreck is that of the Trinité, Ribault’s flagship, which played a fateful role in the early history of the New World. Ribault’s fleet of four ships left France to support the small, struggling French Protestant colony at Fort Caroline. The Spanish came at about the same time, with orders to wipe out the French outpost in land that Spain claimed for itself. Ribault sailed to attack the new Spanish settlement in St. Augustine, but his ships were driven south in a hurricane, leaving Fort Caroline virtually undefended. During the storm, the Spanish marched north and took over the French colony, seizing firm control of Florida for the next couple centuries. The location of the French ships, wrecked in the storm, remained a mystery for centuries. The Republic of France last week filed legal claim to the shipwreck in the Orlando court, saying that under the U.S. Sunken Military Craft Act, ships that sailed for France still belong to France. That’s so even if more than four centuries have passed, said James A. Goold, the attorney representing France. He’s worked with several countries in numerous high-profile disputes with underwater treasure seekers. “Admiralty law and...

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Gorgonian (sea fan) corals on the twilight reefs of Pohnpei Island. (credit: Sonia J. Rowley) Sonia J. Rowely, post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, received the prestigious Sir David Attenborough Award for Fieldwork from the Systematics Association and the Linnean Society of London. Rowley’s work was selected based on her project entitled “Exploration and Systematics of Twilight Reef Gorgonian Corals at Pakin Atoll.” She is only the third person to receive this award, which was given to her for her work during the 2015 Pohnpei Expedition. Tropical coral reefs throughout the Indo-Pacific are critical to marine biodiversity. About 80% of reefs exist between depths of 100-500 feet and are among the most diverse, yet most unexplored, realms on the planet. These ‘twilight zone’ reefs, known as Mesophotic coral ecosystems or MCEs, are typically dominated by gorgonian (sea fan) corals. New technology enables new discoveries Sonia J. Rowley The mysteries of these twilight reefs are only recently being revealed through technological advances in closed circuit rebreather diving. Previously overlooked—being too precarious for conventional SCUBA and too shallow to justify the cost of frequent submersible dives—twilight reefs continuously disclose breathtaking levels of biodiversity with each dive, yielding species and behavioral interactions new to science. Further, MCEs are classified as conservation priority ecosystems and posited to act as refugia against environmental disturbances. The primary aim of the Pohnpei field project was to explore and describe gorgonian corals on the unexplored deep-reefs of Pakin Atoll using technological advances in electronically controlled rebreathers, data digitization and dissemination. A lifetime of training “I was raised on commercial diving vessels in the UK and I am now a test pilot for Poseidon/CisLunar rebreather technology,” said Rowley. “It’s amazing to combine this advanced technology with marine science and biology. Ultimately, I want to know what things are, what they do, and how this came about relative to the environment over geological time. This involves continuously pursuing a suite of technological techniques to address various research questions, which essentially provide information to how deep gorgonian corals have been so biologically successful over time. In addition, this type of research has and continues to benefit local communities.” Bringing the ‘twilight zone’ to light Rebreather dive team, from left, Richard Pyle, Sonia Rowley and Brian Greene. (credit: K. Kaing.) In collaboration with the Waikīkī Aquarium, Rowley and others are developing ways to re-create conditions that closely match the twilight reef environment. Through continuous measurements of key parameters, they are working to create a natural exhibit of gorgonian coral and increase understanding of adaptations that have evolved over time....

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Lucaz Abrams highlights lifestyle of sperm whales, technology’s role in marine exploration. Townsville, Australia (PRWEB) November 28, 2016 An Australian author, based in Queensland, has published his debut novel that examines how humans interact with the ocean and its inhabitants. Through a unique pair of stories, Lucaz Abrams demonstrates the majesty and mystery of the sperm whale as well as the intimate access that modern technology, particularly virtual reality, offers to those who wish to explore the ocean remotely in his novel, “DEV-OCEAN.” Abrams’s fascination with the evolution of whales as well as his proximity to the Great Barrier Reef is demonstrated in his fluid descriptions of marine life and the mysterious, sometimes ghostly, underbelly of the ocean. A key theme of the book, Abrams emphasizes the importance of conservation efforts in regard to marine life and marine mammal life. “We only vaguely know what’s happening down there in the deepest, darkest abyss where only a few dare to go,” Abrams said. “It all tempts our curiosity and imagination.” The book’s first story exhibits a wide range of emotions as a seafarer encounters a sperm whale during a mid-ocean fog that obscures the real world. In the second story, a young surfer dives into a virtual reality-style reef exploration game for that ultimate scuba experience with true-to-life interactions and drama that stretch his bravado to the limit. “DEV-OCEAN” will grip readers with its spontaneity, spirit of adventure and graceful approach to examining marine life. “DEV-OCEAN” By Lucaz Abrams ISBN: 978-0-9944403-1-0 (paperback); 978-0-9944403-2-7 (electronic) Available at the Lulu Online Bookstore, Barnes & Noble and Amazon About the author Lucaz Abrams has a background in visual arts and currently lives in Queensland, Australia, in close proximity to the Great Barrier Reef. He hopes to see the resources of the world’s oceans used in a responsible and sustainable way. To learn more, please visit http://www.abrams-dev-ocean.com.au/. ### Review Copies & Interview Requests: LAVIDGE – Phoenix Danielle Grobmeier 480-998-2600 x 614 dgrobmeier(at)lavidge(dot)com General Inquiries: LAVIDGE – Phoenix     Kalin Batts     480-998-2600 x 524     kbatts(at)lavidge(dot)com For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2016/11/prweb13877517.htm marineexploration –...

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