Would you use a shower with recycled water? Technology could save families £1,000 a year in energy bills by reusing water as it drains away

Posted on Mar 1, 2016


  • ‘Shower of the Future’ reuses water that would normally go down the drain
  • It uses 80% less electricity than normal showers and 10% as much water
  • Tech similar to that used in International Space Station where no water can be wasted 

A high-tech shower that recycles dirty water could save families more than £1,000 a year in energy bills, its designers say.

The technology, which uses 80 per cent less electricity and around 90 per cent less water than a conventional model, is similar to that used in the International Space Station where no water can be wasted.

In an ordinary shower, heat is lost when the soapy warm water runs down the drain. By recycling this, the unit radically cuts down the amount of water used – and the electricity needed to heat it.

A high-tech shower that recycles your dirty water uses 80 per cent less electricity and just 10 per cent as much water. In an ordinary shower, heat is lost when the soapy warm water runs down the drain. By recycling this, the unit radically cuts down the amount of water used – and the electricity needed to heat it

Being so environmentally friendly is not cheap. The shower costs £3,300 for the unit integrated into a bathroom floor, while a stand-alone ‘cabin’ design costs £4,100.

But Sweden-based Orbital Systems, makers of the ‘Shower of the Future’, claims a UK family using metered water could save £1,100 a year in energy bills – if four showers are taken a day, each lasting nine minutes.

HOW THE SHOWER WORKS 

The used water passes through two filters – one that removes larger particles such as skin and dust, and a finer one that gets rid of any bacteria, blood and viruses. 

The water is then reheated and circulates back out of the shower head.

The manufacturers say the shower starts with five litres of water, but if sensors detect this has become too contaminated to reuse, fresh water is added.  

The water then recirculates back out of the shower head. It is reheated to the temperature set by the user – although reheating the water requires much less energy.  

The used water passes through two filters – one that removes larger particles such as skin and dust, and a finer one that gets rid of any bacteria, blood and viruses. The water is then reheated and circulates back out of the shower head.

The manufacturers say the shower starts with five litres of water, but if sensors detect this has become too contaminated to reuse, fresh water is added.  

The water then recirculates back out of the shower head. It is reheated to the temperature set by the user – although reheating the water requires much less energy.  

The makers delivered the first showers in December – with sales to the Swedish military as well as nursing homes and hospitals, according to the inventor.

Mehrdad Mahdjoubi told the Guardian that while washing machines and toilets were reducing how much water they used, the same was not true of showers.

The used water passes through two filters – one that removes larger particles such as skin and dust, and a finer one that gets rid of any bacteria, blood and viruses. The technology is similar to that used in the International Space Station where no water can be wasted

‘Without changing the technology we seem to just heat up water and put it down the drain.’ Mr Mahdjoubi, who said he dreamt up the shower while working on a project for Nasa.

He added: ‘The reason that we make it work sustainably in space is because we have to do it.

‘What if we try the same things on Earth. If the house was like a space capsule, how would we go about it? 

Mr Mahdjoubi said that nursing homes in Sweden have bought the system to make use of the filtration system – to make sure that any water is free from Legionnaire’s Disease, which can grow in water tanks.

watertechnology – Bing News

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